The Birth of Freethought

By James Haught

James Haught is editor of West Virginia’s largest newspaper, The Charleston Gazette, and a senior editor of Free Inquiry. He is 87-years-old and would like to help secular causes more. This series is a way of giving back.

(Dec. 2, 2019 – Daylight Atheism)

The war between science and religion began in Ancient Greece. More than two millennia ago, the Greek peninsula was the first known place where a few intelligent thinkers sought natural explanations for phenomena instead of swallowing supernatural ones.

At that time, magical faith abounded. Greeks sacrificed thousands of animals to a zoo of absurd gods who supposedly lived atop Mount Olympus. Greeks also flocked to oracles, priestesses who supposedly relayed messages from the gods.

In fact, oracle temples reaped so much wealth from gullible listeners that a series of “sacred wars” erupted over oracle riches – and the wars enabled neighboring Macedonia to seize Greece, wiping out city-states and launching the reign of Alexander the Great.

Amid this supernatural chaos, pioneer thinkers took early steps toward scientific knowledge – often at the risk of death, because those who disagreed with religion were prosecuted for “impiety.”

An excellent account of this birth of freethought is An Archeology of Disbelief: The Origin of Secular Philosophy by retired professor Edward “Mike” Jayne (Hamilton Books, 2018).

His 200-page volume gives detailed information about a multitude of classic Greeks and their schools of thought – along with their successors, Cicero and Lucretius in Rome. The book begins:

“The practice of religion may be traced back as many as 300,000 years, and identifiable religious groups existed during the Neolithic Age perhaps 30,000 years ago. On the other hand, there is no evidence of outspoken religious disbelief until the sixth century BCE, roughly twenty-five hundred years ago. This repudiation first occurred in Ancient Greece when so-called natural philosophers began to engage in speculative inquiry…. Why was Greek civilization unique as the source of this remarkable secular revolution?”

Dr. Jayne acknowledges that some other early civilizations, in China, India and Iran, had traces of freethought – but not with the scientific spirit of Greek nonconformists. For example, in India, the now-extinct Carvaka school of Hinduism had no gods or afterlife. And the Jain branch of Hinduism has no creator god. (I wonder if Dr. Jayne feels kinship with the Jains?)

Regardless, those brave first Greek skeptics planted the roots of freethinking in the West.

Prodicus (c. 400 BCE) reportedly said: “The gods of popular belief do not exist.”

Epicurus (341-270 BCE) saw “the problem of evil” – that terrible diseases, natural disasters and predator cruelties prove that no all-loving, all-merciful, father-creator-god can exist.

Socrates (470-399 BCE) was sentenced to death for “refusing to recognize the gods” of Athens.

Stilpo of Megara (360-280 BCE), charged with saying that Athena was “not a god,” joked at his trial that she was a goddess instead. He was exiled.

Aspasia, beloved mistress of the ruler Pericles (495-429 BCE), likewise was tried for impiety, but his pleas saved her.

Diagoras of Melos (5th century BCE) was sentenced to death as a “godless person,” but escaped into exile.

Anaxagoras (5th century BCE) was prosecuted for saying the sun and moon are natural objects, not deities. He also fled Athens.

Protagoras (485-415 BCE) wrote that it’s impossible to know whether gods exist. Charged with impiety, he tried to escape to Sicily, but drowned at sea.

Xenophanes (560-478 BCE) joked that if oxen, lions and horses could envision gods, they would make them look like oxen, lions and horses.

Even the mighty Aristotle (384-322 BCE) was accused of doubt, and fled Athens.

Others charged included Theophrastos, Alcibiades and Andocides.

In the play Bellerophon by Euripides (484-406 BCE), the main character says:

“Doth someone say that there be gods above? There are not. No, there are not. Let no fool, led by the old false fable, thus deceive you.”

In the play Knights by Aristophanes (448-380 BCE), another scoffs:

“Shrines! Shrines! Surely you don’t believe in the gods. What’s your argument? Where’s your proof?”

All this skepticism arose in Ancient Greece. It was suppressed under Christianity in the Dark Ages, but sprang back in the Renaissance, the Enlightenment and the Age of Reason to live in modern scientific times.

(Haught, longtime editor of West Virginia’s largest newspaper, The Charleston Gazette-Mail, is a weekly contributor to Daylight Atheism.)

Scott Douglas Jacobsen is the Founder of In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal and In-Sight Publishing. He authored/co-authored some e-booksfree or low-cost. If you want to contact Scott: Scott.D.Jacobsen@Gmail.com.

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Image Credit: James Haught.

One thought on “The Birth of Freethought

  1. Due to COVID, I have had a hard time dealing with isolation, my dad died mid April of cancer, so 2020 has not been a very good year.I have good friends who are devout Christians, but continuously tried to convert me to their religion. Always politely said no, until my dad died, then it finally came to a head, they claim god is real, that he does exist. Then I became inundated by religious people constantly sending religious posts to me via my FB page. They are claiming COVID is the end of the world, all the fires floods hurricanes are gods work punishing us..I have blocked at least 5 people even after asking them to stop. So finally I told my friends if God, is a real being, have him come to my home, knock on my door and help heal my anxiety and disability, then I would believe. Yeah that went well, they pulled out their bible and told me it does not work that way I have to have faith…….in an imaginary being. Seems the only way to communicate with their “real” god, is to have money and faith. That is the biggest ponzi scheme ever..You can contact god if you are ready to donate money to the church, and the believers are the biggest suckers. That is why I am an Atheist.

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